Category: Arts & Culture

Keep it Real; The Role of Affinity Spaces at Crystal

By: Sarina D. (’19)
Most of us are familiar with the term alliance group, and have seen or participated in some form of this specialized type of community through organizations such as the Gender Sexuality Alliance or a culture club.  In the past few decades, alliance groups have been normalized in American high schools and communities, and are becoming increasingly prevalent and diversified across the board. Crystal is no exception. Our campus is home to a variety of alliance groups, from GSA to Asian Culture Club to French Club, and we utilize these spaces to bring together people with a common commitment to an identifier group, e.g race, gender, religion, family status. In essence, an alliance group is a place for members of said group and people who support and stand in solidarity with that group to advocate for its benefits.

2017 Top Ten: The most memorable events and trends of 2017

By: Sarina D. (’19)
2017 was an exceptionally eventful year- from political chaos on the international stage and at home, to new cultural movements and trends, to natural disasters and natural phenomenons- newscasters never saw a dull day while Americans purposefully tapped into social media and the news like never before. As we kick off a new year of new goals, trends, and hopes, it is important to look back at the events which defined and dominated the past year. So, in no particular order, here are ten of the most significant events of 2017.

#MeToo: The Impact, The Reality  

By: Sarina D. (’19) 
On Monday, October 15th, Twitter was flooded with thousands and thousands of tweets, all of them sharing two short but immensely powerful words: me too.
It all started when 44-year-old actress Alyssa Milano, in the wake of the Harvey Weinstein allegations, tweeted out, “If you’ve been sexually harassed or assaulted write ‘me too’ as a reply to this tweet.” She was bringing back a hashtag first used a decade ago by a woman who had been groped on a bus.

All about Halloween

By: Caitlin R. (’20)
Halloween. When we hear this word, what comes to mind? Maybe ghosts, candy, trick-or-treating, costumes, scary movies, and having a scary, but fun night with friends. We have all celebrated Halloween like this our whole lives, without even knowing where these traditions come from.

Why Beauty Standards Are Wrong

By: Taylor H. (’21)
It’s no secret that each region of the world has their own beauty standards. For example, in Western Culture, it’s all about having curves, being tan, and having big lips. In stark contrast, beauty standards in Korea are focused on being skinny and pale and having big eyes (think Kpop idols). What’s considered beautiful in one region will often reflect what a culture values.

Crazy Fall Facts

By: Marlena B. (’20)
-Europeans eat around 46 pounds of apples annually
-Starbucks has sold over 200 million pumpkin spice lattes in the last 11 years (that’s around $80 million in revenue)
-Jack O’ Lanterns came from Irish immigrants coming to America

Rihanna Has Done It Again

By: Gracie H. (’18)
We all know Rihanna as an award winning singer and songwriter, street style influencer and feminist icon, but Rihanna just hit it out of the park with the release of her new makeup line. Fenty Beauty is strongly focused on inclusivity. Typically, when a brand launches a new face product, it’s released in five to ten shades which mainly cater to lighter complexions. Companies fail to realize that there are hundreds of skin colors and skin tones to take into consideration, so their limited shade range limits the amount of people who can buy their product. Well, not Rihanna. She released a whopping 40 shades to cater to every skin tone.

Is Today’s Hyper-Partisanship Truly an Historical Anomaly?

By: Gabrielle L. (’18)
Without doubt, the vicious polarization of the 2016 Presidential Campaign and the subsequent election of the Trump administration increased talk of today’s ‘historically-unparalleled’ political partisanship. In fact, in Barack Obama’s 2017 farewell address, he referred to his inability to reverse the 21st century hyper-partisan trend as “one of the few regrets” of his presidency; the challenges of today’s congressional gridlock are well acknowledged by both the government and public. Despite this, although modern Congress is often criticized for exhibiting a hyper-partisanship incomparable to any other time period in our nation’s history, political science metrics suggest that current congressional polarization actually marks a return to historical norms.